Thought And Feelings Shape Your Reality

Thought And Feelings Shape Your Reality

Introduction

Most people have heard the saying “thoughts become things”. But what does it actually mean? How can our thoughts shape our reality? In this post I’ll explain how, and show you why it matters for your life.

You are what you think

You are what you think.

Your thoughts determine your reality. Everything in life is caused by something, and all causes have a cause. But the cause of every effect is thought! For example, if you think “I’m lonely,” then this thought will become an emotion and then an action: You may cry or call someone to chat on the phone with them or go out with friends who can help lift your mood. All these things lead to experiences that shape your future thoughts about loneliness, which will lead to more similar experiences over time because they keep reinforcing those same beliefs about being alone (or feeling alone). This process repeats itself until a new belief is formed—this one being that “being around other people helps me feel less lonely.”

This is just one example of how our thoughts become reality. The good news is that we have complete control over our thoughts and the way they create our experiences. If you want to change your life, then start by changing your thoughts! .

The way you feel, the things that happen to you, and the way others treat you all result from your thinking processes.

You’ve probably heard the phrase, “Thoughts and feelings shape your reality.” The truth of this statement can be seen in every aspect of our lives.

The way you feel, the things that happen to you, and the way others treat you all result from your thinking processes.

Your emotions are a reaction to something. They are not just random feelings that appear out of nowhere. Your emotions have causes and effects just like everything else in life does! Think about it for a moment… What is an emotion? An emotion is an internal reaction to some stimulus (thought or physical sensation) within an organism (person). Emotions are created by thought processes which means that thoughts create emotions! This means that if I am angry at someone who has treated me poorly then my anger was created by my own thoughts which were based on their behavior toward me!

If someone else treats us poorly then they give us good reason for feeling angry but those feelings do not come out of nowhere; they come from our own inner world where we have certain beliefs about what people should do and how they should treat us as human beings!

Emotions are created by our thoughts and beliefs. The way we feel, the things that happen to us, and the way others treat us all result from our thinking processes.

Your thoughts create your reality

You can’t stop thinking. Your mind is always looking for answers and patterns, even when you don’t want it to. It’s programmed that way because your brain wants the best chance of survival. It’s constantly trying to make sense of things so you can predict what will happen next and be prepared for danger.

That’s why if you think about an airplane crashing into your house, even though it probably won’t happen today, tomorrow or next week…your mind still thinks about it over and over again. You are constantly trying to find patterns in everything around you so that when something happens (like a plane crash), your brain knows how to react without having time think about what might happen next – because then there wouldn’t be enough time!

So since we can never stop thinking…why not reframe our thoughts? Reframing means changing what we focus on so that instead of seeing things negatively (like being broke), we view them positively (like being resourceful).

Your mind is wired for survival

Your mind is wired for survival. In order to survive, it has to be quick and efficient. It can’t wait until you have all the information before making any decisions. Think about how many times in your life you’ve made a decision while thinking “I’ll think about this later, when I have more information”. The problem is that, by then, the decision may already be made!

Your brain isn’t perfect. Sometimes, it makes assumptions based on incomplete information or jumps to conclusions without having all the facts available. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing—it’s what allows us as humans to make quick decisions so we can keep ourselves safe from danger or harm (think “fight or flight”). But sometimes these automatic reactions become undesirable habits that lead us astray from our goals of living happy lives filled with meaning and purpose.

It must maintain stability and balance – a constant state of homoeostasis.

There is no doubt that the human body is a wondrous machine. It must maintain stability and balance – a constant state of homoeostasis. This is achieved through complex internal regulatory mechanisms that monitor and control the internal environment of the body by regulating temperature, blood pressure, pH and other variables.

However, the self-regulating system of the human body has another function: it also regulates our thoughts and feelings! In fact, all thoughts and feelings trigger chemicals in our brains which activate or deactivate certain neural pathways – thus creating changes in our physical bodies (for example changing your heart rate).

It does this by filling in the gaps with guesses about what’s going on around you.

Your mind is always making guesses about what’s going on around you. These guesses are based on things like your beliefs and circumstances. Your beliefs are shaped by your past experiences, which in turn are shaped by your culture and circumstances.

If you have a belief that people are mean, then when someone says something mean to you, it confirms this belief and makes you feel justified in feeling angry at them. But if they say something nice instead of mean—like “I like the way you look today!”—then that doesn’t fit with the idea of people being mean, so it just gets ignored or dismissed as a fluke (which means “something unusual”).

Most of these guesses are based on your beliefs.

Our beliefs are the way we interpret the world around us. They are formed by our experiences, but they can be conscious or unconscious, good or bad and helpful or harmful.

The way you feel about something is shaped partly by your beliefs. For example, if someone asks you how you feel about your friend’s new haircut, your response will depend largely on what kind of haircut it is: “It looks nice” versus “It’s horrible”. The way in which we respond to situations says more about our own personalities than it does about our experiences. If a person believes that everyone will think they look good with long hair then they’ll say that their friend looks great with long hair even though their opinion doesn’t match reality (everyone else thinks she looks like a boy).

Your assumptions or beliefs lead to feelings.

What you assume to be true is what you believe to be true. And your beliefs help shape the way that you feel and act in response to a stimulus (or lack thereof).

For example, let’s say that you assume that most people don’t like you. That assumption will lead to feelings of loneliness and sadness due to not being liked by others. If instead, we choose to believe that most people are friendly and accepting, this belief leads us toward feelings of warmth and comfort in social situations where there might otherwise have been fear or awkwardness experienced instead.

And then those feelings lead to actions and reactions.

  • Emotions are the driving force behind our actions and reactions.
  • They’re the result of beliefs, thoughts and feelings — often based on past experiences that we’ve stored in our subconscious mind.
  • If you want to change your life, start by changing your thoughts and feelings about it!

Believing it’s because they like you will probably make you feel good and prompt you to give them something in return.

Beliefs are the result of your thoughts. If you believe someone likes you, it’s likely that this belief will prompt you to feel good about yourself and to want to give them something in return. This is how beliefs lead to feelings and then actions.

Beliefs are not always based on fact or accurate information: it can be difficult for people who are struggling with mental health issues to make sense of their experiences, so sometimes they’ll form false beliefs about what’s going on around them (for example, believing other people have caused their problems). However, because these false beliefs were formed as a result of distorted thinking patterns – such as thought suppression – it’s important for us all to do our best not only when we’re feeling ‘at our best’ but also when things aren’t going well!

While believing it’s because they want something from you will probably make you feel bad, or suspicious, and less likely to give them anything.

So, what does this mean for you? While believing it’s because they want something from you will probably make you feel bad, or suspicious, and less likely to give them anything. But if your mind jumps to their intentions first—well that might be just fine! You’re thinking about the situation in a way that makes sense to you at the time. That’s not a bad thing; it means your brain is working properly!

And sometimes when people are trying to manipulate us into doing something we don’t want—like giving away our money—they do so by making us feel like we have no choice. But as long as we recognize this tactic and don’t let ourselves get sucked into feeling manipulated by someone else’s words alone (like “You owe me”) then we can still make our own choices about what is best for us

The same applies when someone else treats you badly.

The same applies when someone else treats you badly. When someone says or does something hurtful, it’s easy to assume what their motivation might be and feel bad about yourself in response. It can also lead to a host of other thoughts and feelings like:

  • “How could they say that?”
  • “If I’d done things differently…”
  • “I’m such an idiot.”

These thoughts and feelings can cause your body language to change, which then influences how people react to you—and whether they continue treating you badly or not.

You may assume their behaviour is due to their own limitations (maybe they’re angry with themselves), or it could be due to some failing in your own personality that caused them to dislike you. Feelings of fear, anxiety or insecurity could follow either thought pattern.

You may assume their behaviour is due to their own limitations (maybe they’re angry with themselves), or it could be due to some failing in your own personality that caused them to dislike you. Feelings of fear, anxiety or insecurity could follow either thought pattern.

You cannot control the thoughts and feelings of others, but you can control your own. If you are feeling anxious or insecure, this is a clear indication that you are thinking anxious or insecure thoughts. You need to question the validity of these negative thoughts by asking yourself if there is evidence for each one – if not, then it’s time to let go!

A lot of what we experience every day can be boiled down to our thoughts and resulting emotions

A lot of what we experience every day can be boiled down to our thoughts and resulting emotions.

  • You cannot always control your thoughts.
  • You cannot always control your emotions.
  • You cannot always control what happens to you.
  • You cannot always control how others treat you.
  • And sometimes people make mistakes that hurt us or make us feel bad, but as long as we don’t let it affect our inner peace and positivity for the future, then there’s no reason for us to hold on to negative feelings that are not in alignment with our values anymore!

Conclusion

We all have the power to shape our reality, but it takes a lot of work. If you’re looking to take control of your life, start by recognising that your thoughts and feelings are shaping your reality, whether you’re aware of it or not. With PSYCH-K I work with you to change these thought/beliefs to more self empowering . WWW.IMYOU.CO.UK